On the Historic Diversity of Reformed Theology

Historically there has been room in Reformed theology for a wide range of views on various topics. In this post Mark Jones gives further evidence that the theologians who made up the Westminster Assembly had a diversity of opinion and that the Westminster Confession  is a consensus document meant to draw a wide range of people together. In other words, Westminster was broadly Reformed and not meant to articulate any particular strain of Reformed thought. Give it it a read:

http://www.reformation21.org/blog/2014/10/reformed-theological-diversity.php

By the way, the Hebrew word at the top of the post is “shibboleth.” Read Judges 12:6 and surrounding for more information.

A Chance To Thrive

A Chance To Thrive

I love this story! It reminds me of another socially awkward “smart” kid from rural South Carolina who was given an opportunity to thrive that he would have gotten no where else.

Yes, Virginia, I am talking about myself.

Kudos to the state of South Carolina for continuing to support this wonderful school for gifted young South Carolinians. It’s sort of like Charles Xavier’s school (if you are familiar with X-Men). Gifted children have to be taught how to deal with their gifts and harness them for the greater good of society.

I bet this kid turns out all right. 

Old Soul’s Hard Work Turns Into Big Opportunity: Young man accepted to South Carolina Governor’s School

I love this story! It reminds me of another socially awkward “smart” kid from rural South Carolina who was given an opportunity to thrive that he would have gotten no where else.

Yes, Virginia, I am talking about myself.

The New York times did a wonderful piece on my high school alma mater highlighting how this school gives so many kids a chance to thrive in an environment where they will not be viewed as weird or abnormal, and encouraged to develop as complete human persons. I loved what one commenter on the NYT article said, “For me and many others, attending was a revelation. It was proof that we weren’t crazy; there were others like us.”

Kudos to the state of South Carolina for continuing to support this wonderful school for gifted young South Carolinians. It’s sort of like Charles Xavier’s school (if you are familiar with X-Men). Gifted children have to be taught how to deal with their gifts and harness them for the greater good of society.

I bet this kid turns out all right.

Home

Home.

We often think fondly of our homes, where we are from. I grew up in rural South Carolina at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains. I spent my summers exploring the woods around our house, playing in the streams and discovering interesting animals and plants. There was a cattle farm across the street from our house which emanated interesting smells and sounds. My grand parents lived two houses down, which was a quarter of a mile in those parts. I would often walk or ride my bike to see them. They would always offer me orange juice, cookies and ice cream. I had several trails through the woods that I could take to visit their house before my parents would let me walk or ride my bicycle on the road. I knew every square foot of those woods. Every hollow and every tree.

Home.

What is home? Is it a place or is it a feeling? Isn’t home the way you feel when you are most comfortable. The place where you can wear your PJ’s and not feel like you’re somehow being informal or immodest? Isn’t home the place where you can sleep a deep sleep and not wake up in the night wondering where you are? Isn’t home a sense of comfort, a feeling of relaxation, void of the worries and cares of the outside?

Home.

The rock group Metallica famously screamed, “Where I lay my head is home.” Their anthem is eerily, and perhaps uncomfortably, similar to Jesus’ own statement, “The Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head.” Metallica roams because they are revolutionaries, speaking their minds as they please. Is this similar to Jesus? Maybe on the surface, but there is a fundamental difference. Jesus has no place to lay his head because he has rejected his first home. Yet rebellion and anarchy is not the end of Jesus’ story. Jesus is not just rejecting his first home, he is busy building a new home and a new household and a new family. This is why he famously tells his mother and his brothers, “who are my mother and my brothers? Whoever does the will of God, he is my brother and my sister and my mother.” You see, Jesus is not just rejecting the old home in order to become a vagabond, a wandering ascetic, he is putting off the old in order to build something new. A new home. A new family.

Home.

One of the things that we most long is to feel at home. This is one of our deepest felt needs as human persons. We want to be loved. We want to be cared for. We want to be touched, embraced, and kissed. We want to feel comfortable, relaxed, and safe. We want to be home.

The good news of the gospel for you today is that Jesus is building a home for you here in his church. A place where you can be known. A place where you can be loved. A place where you can be safe.

Home